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straight blast with sticks...[long]

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  • straight blast with sticks...[long]

    hello,

    i was on another forum and there was mention of straight blast but done with sticks (with variations/modifications of course). it brought to mind an old post on ED i read and figured i would post here for you to "play" with.

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    Eskrima/FMA Digest Friday, 9 February 1996 Volume 03 : Number 025

    From: Sticman@aol.com
    Date: Fri, 9 Feb 1996 04:00:46 -0500
    Subject: Re: eskrima: Power debate

    In a message dated 96-02-08 22:43:42 EST, you write:

    > I was wondering if you can make any of Sonny's fulcrum points
    >work as far as delivering strikes.>>

    Sonny Umpad's fulcrum techniques are pretty refined, a specialization
    that he works with great effect. I'm nowhere near his level with this,
    though knowing what he does has helped me add to my understanding of my own
    Serrada techniques, and on occasion I can slip in one of his moves. I have,
    in fact, come to use his concepts within Serrada.

    For those not familiar with Sonny's stuff, he has a tightly integrated
    method of escrima which he calls Corto Kadena, which is a highly functional
    and "live" method of using double sticks. This "short chain" links strikes
    together successively using progressive sequences of fulcrums, so that each
    strike in the chain gains maximum power from leveraging the hit. Example:
    In basic 6-count sinawalli, the first two strikes are a #1 with the right,
    followed by a left backhand. In Sonny's method, the second strike would use
    the right elbow as a fulcrum to generate power in a snappng hit. He could
    then raise his left elbow to provide the fulcrum for the next hit with the
    original weapon, which is already chambered on the left side in position to
    exploit this. With short sticks, this is very fast and tight for inside
    fighting (corto), though he can also work it well with long weapons for
    greater range. Sonny's study of fulcrum points and leverage allows him to
    use almost any body part, such as hip, thigh, knee, bottom of foot, in
    addition to the hands and arms, so he can always implement this.

    He has combined this technique with another interesting innovation, the
    centerline roll, which is based on Wing Chun punching. In this technique,
    sinawalli striking patterns draw the weapon from under the arm (between the
    upper arm, or armpit, and the body in a continuous motion. The right hand
    draws from under the left side, and vice versa, without changing like typical
    sinawalli. By doing this simple motion, it is possible to counter any double
    stick pattern used by an opponent, because, wether they use right or left,
    you control the center. It's simple, ingenious, and it works. I've seen
    similar inside draws in some Silat, including with a knife, but Sonny's stuff
    is unique.

    Going back to the first idea, of using fulcrums for leverage, it is
    possible (nay, so simple and natural as to be obvious, once learned) to go
    from any leveraged hit to a centerline draw so that the hit can come from
    outside, using leverage, or the inside, using a springloaded snap. The
    reverse is also true. If your training partner is using a common sinawalli
    (of any count), this will change the beat and the relationship of your left
    and right hands to his pattern, throwing him off his timing while allowing
    you to make adjustments much more easily.

    I first was exposed to this stuff back around 1988. Though I don't
    formally train with Sonny, I have had the opportunity to share and compare
    techniques with him. It has been easy to see how his ideas can be adapted by
    single stick tactics, and therefore, by logical extension, how any system
    with good use of the left hand, either "live", with double stick, or espada y
    daga, could find this leveraged application hidden already in what they do.
    Sonny practices all these methods.

    Sonny's stuff is very technical when starting it, so seems awkward.
    Once learned, it flows well. The concepts are sound enough to have
    attracted the attention of martial artists such as Jesse Glover (Jun Fan
    student #1), Wally Jay (creator of the Small Circle Jujitsu style) and
    Greglon Lee (son of JKD co-founder James Yimm Lee).

    Jeff Finder

    ------------------------------

    Eskrima/FMA-Digest Monday, 12 February 1996 Volume 03 : Number 030

    From: Sticman@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 12 Feb 1996 04:26:09 -0500
    Subject: Re: eskrima: Sonny's stuff

    Since I had a number of responses to my post on Sonny Umpad's centerline
    roll and fulcrum techniques, I thought I'd take another stab (wait, that's a
    different thread, but then Sonny has some pretty intense blade stuff, too) at
    describing the general idea. A number of folks said they didn't quite get
    what I was talking about. That's O.K. After all, you're trying to
    understand my description from words, and it took me a long time to get a
    handle on this after seeing it and getting to spend time with Sonny. I
    hadn't done too much with this for awhile, but have been reviewing the
    material for a couple of days now, so maybe I can do a better job. Here
    goes:

    Start with the double stick centerline roll. It's the easy part, and
    can be utilized quickly. Begin in an on guard position. This is a resting
    position, with the right stick tucked under the left armpit and the left
    stick tucked under the right armpit. It's just like crossing your arms on
    your chest, except you're holding the sticks. From here, the basic motion is
    like the Wing Chun centerline punching, of which (hopefully) most of you will
    have some knowledge from magazines, if not training. The idea is that the
    punch shoots straight forward from the center of the chest, and both hands
    can maintain a barrage in this movement. Do the same with the sticks,
    allowing them to snap as they come free from under the arm. It's best to keep
    the strikes more or less vertical. If they flatten out, reach is compromised
    and your hands become exposed. Also, you're more likely to hit your own
    elbows on the return. After each strike, the weapon returns to it's original
    starting position, so that your centerline is always protected by a hand in
    front of it. A good Wing Chun practitioner can generate 8 (I'm sure someone
    will say more) strikes per second with the centerline punches; Sonny can do
    this with the sticks, which, considering the greater reach and hardness of
    the weapon, is quite a buzz saw.

    After getting the initial idea, go to hitting a stationary target, such
    as someone holding a stick (make it long enough to avoid hitting the hands)
    horizontally in front of you so you can get conistent targetting directly in
    front. The next step might be for you and your partner to both do the roll
    together, right to right, left to left, like basic sinawalli training. Next,
    one of you does a regular 6-count sinawalli, while the other does the
    centerline roll. Notice how the roll can consistently control the
    centerline, taking out any strike, left or right, with either hand.

    There is also what I refer to as a "Hong Kong" style of double stick
    that I've seen from a number of Chinese fighters, in which the two weapons
    are chambered on the front of the chest or collarbones, pointed upwards,
    along either side of the neck. Strikes are simple, delivered downward in
    quick succession with alternating hands, much like playing drums, and are
    designed to hit towards and control the center (these can be snapped off the
    collarbone for greater power, using fulcrums). Sonny's centerline roll is
    able to effectively counter this as well, so it is quite versatile with
    little or no adjustments beyond targetting.
    Once this technique has been learned, the next step would be the
    leveraged or fulcrum strikes. Let's say you start with a right strike from
    the centerline roll on guard position; rather than return the weapon back
    under the left armpit as the left hand goes out, bring the right stick back
    just far enough so that the middle of the left forearm comes to rest across
    the right stick out near the end (not all the way, about 3/4 or so, maybe
    varies by length of stick). From here, several hitting options are
    available. First, you could use the impact of the left forearm on your right
    stick to simply spin it through into a #1 strike; second, you could press
    forward with your left forearm, so that it is parallel to your chest, as you
    turn your right hand over (palm up) to hit with the tip of the right weapon,
    which points straight out in front of you. This strike, without the left arm
    as a fulcrum, would be a simple abanico. From here spin the right weapon
    through into a #1 strike, much like in the first option given here, coming to
    the opposite side chambering of the left stick against the right elbow, ready
    for another leveraged hit on this side.

    As familiarity with this grows, one can find more opportunities to
    insert a hit than in most basic hitting methods, and can generate strong
    "short" power at tight ranges. One can quickly and easily change direction
    and momentum, so that your opponent doesn't know whcih hand wil be coming
    next.

    In talking to one of my students today, I came up with the phrase
    "Flowing Randomness"to describe this material. The moves can flow in
    continuous, non-stop action, but they are random, in that the direction is
    not predetermined but is open to split-second adjustment through timing and
    opportunism. It is precise and purposeful, and that's the way we like it!

    Jeff Finder

    ------------------------------

    Eskrima/FMA-Digest Monday, 12 February 1996 Volume 03 : Number 033

    From: "Randall M. Brannan"
    Date: Mon, 12 Feb 96 13:15:00 PST
    Subject: Re: eskrima: Sonny's stuff

    At 04:26 AM 2/12/96 -0500, Sticman@aol.com wrote:
    > Since I had a number of responses to my post on Sonny Umpad's centerline
    >roll and fulcrum techniques, I thought I'd take another stab.
    >
    >Explanation of snapping technique deleted...
    >

    Thanks for a very clear explanation of the centerline snapping technique.
    Forgive my further questions but I'm having a hard time getting clear
    on the leveraged strikes.

    > Once this technique has been learned, the next step would be the
    >leveraged or fulcrum strikes. Let's say you start with a right strike from
    >the centerline roll on guard position; rather than return the weapon back
    >under the left armpit as the left hand goes out, bring the right stick back
    >just far enough so that the middle of the left forearm comes to rest across
    >the right stick out near the end (not all the way, about 3/4 or so, maybe
    >varies by length of stick).

    It's not clear to me whether the left arm here is still resting against the
    body in the "on guard" position or it has already delivered it's first strike
    in the centerline roll. If it has already struck, then the left forearm
    must be
    extended straight out along the centerline of the body and parallel to the
    ground. Which one is it?

    > From here, several hitting options are
    >available. First, you could use the impact of the left forearm on your right
    >stick to simply spin it through into a #1 strike; second, you could press
    >forward with your left forearm, so that it is parallel to your chest, as you
    >turn your right hand over (palm up) to hit with the tip of the right weapon,
    >which points straight out in front of you.

    The way I'm picturing it, this one looks like a snap rather than a leveraged
    strike. Am I picturing it wrong?

    Randy B.

    ------------------------------

    From: Sticman@aol.com
    Date: Mon, 12 Feb 1996 17:16:23 -0500
    Subject: Re: eskrima: Sonny's stuff

    In a message dated 96-02-12 16:22:03 EST, you write:

    >It's not clear to me whether the left arm here is still resting against the
    >body in the "on guard" position or it has already delivered it's first
    strike
    >in the centerline roll. If it has already struck, then the left forearm
    >must be extended straight out along the centerline of the body and parallel
    to the
    >ground. Which one is it?

    Your second interpretation here is correct. The left arm has delivered
    its first strike, and now "extends" from the end of the right weapon, along
    its line.

    >> From here, several hitting options are available. First, you could use
    the impact of >> the left forearm on your right stick to simply spin it
    through into a #1 strike; second, >> you could press forward with your left
    forearm, so that it is parallel to your chest, as >> you turn your right hand
    over (palm up) to hit with the tip of the right weapon,
    >>which points straight out in front of you.
    >
    >The way I'm picturing it, this one looks like a snap rather than a leveraged

    >strike. Am I picturing it wrong?

    No, just incompletely. The difference between the snap and leveraged
    strike is the position of the fulcrum. In a snap, the fulcrum is internal,
    inside the wrist. In using Sonny's technique, the right stick would remain
    in contact with the left forearm, it's fulcrum, through the hit, adding mass
    behind the impact. The arc of the strike is basically the same. Without the
    external fulcrum, the standard snap hit could use as much range as possible.
    Sonny's stuff is useful more for generating short range power.
    There is a third option at this juncture which I failed to mention. To
    review quickly, there is the centerline snap with the right stick, then the
    centerline snap with the left, so that it comes to rest on the outstretched
    right stick. The first two options were to then use momentum to spin the
    right stick, or to leverage-hit the left one. A third option would be to
    come in with the right elbow, like a regular elbow strike, but use that to go
    into the leveraged hit with the left stick! Like I said, "Flowing
    Randomness".
    Body angulation, paying particular attention to shifting weight on the
    feet and rocking the shoulders, is very important in utilizing these levers.
    In the centerline roll, OTOH, there is little of this body motion.
    Excellent questions. Just goes to show what happens when I forego sleep
    to write this stuff (check the time stamp!).

    Thanks!

    Jeff Finder

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