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  • Krav Maga or Wing Chun?

    I am looking to get started in either Wing Chun or Krav Maga. Which one would you say is better.

    1) I am looking for something that is designed for street application. I am not looking for an art based around sport.
    2) I want some conditioning.
    3) I do not just want a self defence. I want more of an offense art with striking.
    4) I also want something that is not one dimentional (ie. just striking or just grappling)

    Mainly I want something that is effective in real life situations. Weather it be an attack or a fight.

    I have taken JKD and liked it A LOT. I know that there is a lot of Wing Chun in JKD but I do not know how much or what has been modified. In addition I hear that Wing Chun is a lot more traditional the JKD wich would translate to a longer learning curve for actual street application, right?

    What would you suggest I take up? Thanks.

  • #2
    Why not take more JKD?

    Comment


    • #3
      There are also a growing number of gyms which have discarded styles altogether and call themselves 'reality based' or 'combatives' or something like that. These gyms will be geared for pure street - or as pure as one gets in a gym anyway.

      It almost goes without saying that the quality of your training will depend more on your instructor than what he calls his style.

      You might peruse this forum for information, as well:

      http://message.geoffthompson.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi

      Comment


      • #4
        1) neither.
        2) join the israeli army, then you can be taught the REAL krav maga.

        that's my suggestion

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        • #5
          I don't think Wing Chun is what u r looking 4. Wing Chun has some awesome trapping techniques and hand strikes, but it doesn't necessarily encompass the types of ground fighting I believe u r looking 4. I've read about but never studied Krav Magna, so I really don't know for certain how applicable it truely is. My suggestion is this, which ever you decide on keep this in mind, you have to be able to practice pretty much full out with someone else in free sparring. I know a lot of people will scream that sparring is for sport and blah blah blah, but that's not true. Point sparring is for sport, free sparring is pretty much anything goes. If you don't practice all out against someone you will not be prepared to fight in a real world scenario.

          I've been in real fights, and to be honest 9 out of 10 times regular boxing would serve you as well as most martial arts, if not better. It happens 10x as fast as sparring, so everything has to be reflex. Hitting and reacting to being hit are equally as important. Don't believe u r just going to Seagal someone, that shit doesn't happen. Someon that can't fight for shit might land a lucky punch, and you need to be able to react to it.

          Sparring isn't close to the real thing, but it's the closest thing short of having full out brawls with your training partners. Don't buy into that pre-arranged drill crap and expect it to work when your heart is beating a million times a minute and someone is trying to kick the crap out of you. Unless you are fighting an absolute shmuck you are probably going to get hit and unless you have trained with someone hitting you at or almost at full power you won't really have that much of an advantage when it comes down to the come down.

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          • #6
            geoff thompson is the English "real deal." i agree with the suggestion to go there.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Uber_Tap
              I don't think Wing Chun is what u r looking 4. Wing Chun has some awesome trapping techniques and hand strikes, but it doesn't necessarily encompass the types of ground fighting I believe u r looking 4. I've read about but never studied Krav Magna, so I really don't know for certain how applicable it truely is. My suggestion is this, which ever you decide on keep this in mind, you have to be able to practice pretty much full out with someone else in free sparring. I know a lot of people will scream that sparring is for sport and blah blah blah, but that's not true. Point sparring is for sport, free sparring is pretty much anything goes. If you don't practice all out against someone you will not be prepared to fight in a real world scenario.

              I've been in real fights, and to be honest 9 out of 10 times regular boxing would serve you as well as most martial arts, if not better. It happens 10x as fast as sparring, so everything has to be reflex. Hitting and reacting to being hit are equally as important. Don't believe u r just going to Seagal someone, that shit doesn't happen. Someon that can't fight for shit might land a lucky punch, and you need to be able to react to it.

              Sparring isn't close to the real thing, but it's the closest thing short of having full out brawls with your training partners. Don't buy into that pre-arranged drill crap and expect it to work when your heart is beating a million times a minute and someone is trying to kick the crap out of you. Unless you are fighting an absolute shmuck you are probably going to get hit and unless you have trained with someone hitting you at or almost at full power you won't really have that much of an advantage when it comes down to the come down.

              wow. you've been in enough fights to use the ration 9 out of 10? you're a real tough guy it seems. your post is silly to the point of being deceiving to the thread starter.

              Comment


              • #8
                well krav maga was made for real life situations and not for sport. from what u say u want, krav maga is more what u are describing than wing chun. wing chun is pretty much just striking. im not sure if grav maga is well rounded, but it should be if it was made for real life. also, i think u would like what kajukenbo has to offer. it pretty much sounds like what u are talking about. kajukenbo is for street fighting. 2 of my buddies take kajukenbo and ive seen their classes, its tough. they grapple, box, kick, do weapons training, all kinds of shit. from what ive heard about krav maga, it sounds similar to kajukenbo, although krav maga takes fighting terrorsts and being held hostage and that kinda thing into account in its training i think.

                my friends train here
                http://www.bonosjeetkunedo-kajukenbo.com/
                u can check out what they do, howver this school is a mix of kajukenbo as well as jkd.

                Comment


                • #9
                  btw , it is true that western boxing alone will prob serve u better than most martial arts. its quick and simple and gives u very fast reflexes and u learn to get hit as well as evade hits. the fact is if ur in a fight in the street, its probobly not gonna be against some hardcore martial artist.

                  a long time ago,i was talking martial arts with this guy i knew who has been in many street fights in his day. u know what he told me? he said the best weapon in the street is the old one-two. ur basic jab and ur cross. i didnt beleive him at the time, but after taking western boxing for a while i know he wasnt bsing me.

                  learning to use a knife properly will come in handy too.

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                  • #10
                    My post was from my experience and I certainly didn't mean to leave you with the impression that I fight to the death at least 3 times a week, but I have had experience with fights outside of the dojo and boxing works. Boxing won't teach you to fight 5 guys at once, but despite what many will try to tell you, they can't teach you that either so don't buy into that shit. There is no absolute art, but boxing will give you a good if not better foundation in stand-up hand to hand fighting than anything else.

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                    • #11
                      it's all love i exute, brother. 6 fights is 6 too many. a real threat (not a drunken buffoon) will undermine your wing chun or krav maga or what have you the second he darts his foot into your groin. don't be too reliant on your martial art style. i'm a bouncer. i've seen what i've seen. you don't have to take my advice, but i'm only sharing my opinion.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with both points, 6 is to many(1 is as far as that goes) and you never know what will happen. Choose the people and the enivorments you choose to spend your time with wisely as well. For instance, you are most likely not going to get into a bar room brawl in an upscale establishment while you are out with your in-laws, but if you and your buddies are drunk at the local red neck bar there is as good a chance as anything that someone in your group will have a conflict with someone else, thus creating problems for you.

                        "Superfoot" Bill Wallace said probably one of the most intelligent thing I've ever heard. He was doing a seminar at our school and everyone was talking before it started and someone asked how he has done in bar/street fights. He said he wouldn't know because he doesn't go to bars or any place that has a high risk of conflict. He said he only fights for money, and has never been in a street fight.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks

                          Cool, thanks everyone for your feedback!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hmmm....this thread is deja vu.

                            1) I am looking for something that is designed for street application. I am not looking for an art based around sport.
                            2) I want some conditioning.
                            3) I do not just want a self defence. I want more of an offense art with striking.
                            4) I also want something that is not one dimentional (ie. just striking or just grappling)
                            1. Uncle Corny is right.

                            2. Continue your JKD, but emphasize the kali or BJJ aspect if you're concerned about being one dimensional. Kali's empty hand (mano y mano / panantukan) is much more realistic than Krav Maga's empty hand stuff I've seen. In kali, you'll also get training in stick and knife.

                            3. Take up Muay Thai and crosstrain in BJJ

                            4. Take up boxing and crosstrain in BJJ

                            5. Find an authentic Silat teacher (one that can throw down) and crosstrain in BJJ



                            mr. gordo

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Read this thread before jumping onto the Krav Maga bandwagon:


                              http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...ight=krav+maga



                              mr. gordo

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