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Help With Training Knives

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  • Help With Training Knives

    Hello, please excuse my ignorance if this question has already been asked in the forums but i unfortunately do not have the time to browse every thread. I train at an untraditional school however it does draw influence from Philipino martial arts. We study a good deal of stick and knife fighting and want to take our training to a new level perhaps competeing in some knife fighting tounaments. If anyone could advise me on what is the best brand of chawk knife to but and a website on where i might get it. Im looking to buy in bulk for my school so i would like to stay relatively cheap however quality is most important.

  • #2
    My friend and former instructor is the inventor of sharkee training knives. You can visit his site at Sharkee Martial Arts Training Equipment.

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    • #3
      thanks for the hasty reply!

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      • #4
        You're welcome. Be sure to take a look at the chalk model. You put chalk on the knife and it leaves a mark on your ghi or clothes when you get cut.

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        • #5
          Yea I believe this is what im looking for is that a foam edge around of the knife is so how well does it hold up in training?

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          • #6
            I'm not sure what kind of material it is or how well it holds up. Professor Morgan Thomas, the inventor of that knife, is a man of integrity and I'm sure he would be more than willing to work out a deal with you. I know he sells them in bulk to suppliers and instructors too!!

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            • #7
              Thank you very much!

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              • #8
                canvas photo

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